Convert memory to muscle

Convert memory to muscle

You’ll quickly recognise that some objections will crop up more frequently than others and it won’t take you long to think about a suitable initial response, questions to ask and a strong rebuttal

Emotions are key

Emotions are key

The last thing we want to do when dealing with objections is argue.  So be prepared for objections and recognise that you will get them in any (successful!) sales process.  If you have the right mindset you’ll be more naturally receptive and this will more sincerely be reflected in your initial response

Don’t force the issue

Don’t force the issue

Whilst we should definitely treat every negative as an objection in the first instance be mindful that we should be seeking to qualify whether we are dealing with an objection (which we can work around) or a condition

Be prepared

Be prepared

You’re a professional recruiter operating in sales situations where there are a finite and predictable set of objections that you are likely to hear in any single interaction.

Justify your cost

Justify your cost

Many clients don’t really understand the costs that we incur in providing a temp.

Believe in yourself!

Believe in yourself!

There is a reason why we charge what we charge – it’s because we’re worth it!  The recruiter who genuinely believes in the value of their service will always be in a much stronger position when discussing rates. 

Trade, don’t concede!

Trade, don’t concede!

Recruiters have a tendency to discount for their clients to win or retain business and typically refer to this as “negotiating.”  Bear in mind that there is no negotiation here!

Take the long term view

Take the long term view

Managing Margins is not necessarily about you getting the best possible margin every time.  If you charge clients too much too frequently or try and reduce the temp’s rate past the point where they feel that they are getting a fair deal it often works against us in the long term.

Know what you’re playing with

Know what you’re playing with

It’s often the case that a temp recruiter will work at a percentage margin or mark up.  There’s no problem with this in itself, but it can lead to us losing track of exactly how much a percentage point means in cash terms.

You are the real USP

You are the real USP

Recruitment is a highly competitive marketplace and as a result it can be very difficult to identify genuinely unique sales points around our process or organisation.

Don’t feature dump

Don’t feature dump

FAB selling is not complex! It’s traditional and well known – however, it’s often badly done and perhaps the single biggest mistake made by recruiters is ‘feature dumping’. 

Be nosy!

Be nosy!

Great recruiters are nosy because they want to understand how to best help their candidates and clients.

Product-esteem drives self-esteem

Product-esteem drives self-esteem

Great recruiters have high self-esteem and high self-worth. Much of this derives from their successes – the deals they have done and the fees that they have generated.

Ultimately, it’s YOUR process!

Ultimately, it’s YOUR process!

Every interaction with a candidate or client through the recruitment process presents with it an opportunity for you to enhance your control.

Identify points of leverage

Identify points of leverage

If you build a strong relationship with candidates and clients, they are much more likely to share information with you which will enable you to manage processes more effectively.

Getting the right relationships is key

Getting the right relationships is key

At its crudest, any attempt to control, influence or manage a candidate or client through a recruitment or sales process is likely to be seen as manipulative and self-serving.

Work in groups

Work in groups

Where possible, try and make cold calls at the same time as colleagues of yours.  If there are three of four of you on the phone at the same time it drives competition, development and motivation.

Reward yourself for ‘activity’

Reward yourself for ‘activity’

In the spirit of controlling the controllables, you can’t dictate the amount of success you get from cold calls.  So focus on activity – commit to running a certain number of calls.

Control the controllables

Control the controllables

There are relatively few elements of the cold call that you can control yourself.  Things like the number of calls you make, the timing of those calls and the planning that goes into them are all your responsibility.